Trinity Cathedral Burying Ground

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Church and burial ground have co-existed on site together since 1822, creating a sacred cultural landscape that has remained remarkably constant relative to the dynamic city streetscapes around it.

 

The site of Trinity Episcopal Cathedral has been a place of burial at least since the first land grant of 1779 and possibly earlier as a Native American burial mound. The land was used exclusively as a graveyard until 1822, when a number of burials were exumed and moved to crypts built under a new church constructed on the site. When the present church was constructed between 1869 and 1872 its larger footprint required the removal of additional burials and their markers to other locations in the yard and to other public cemeteries outside the city. Again between 1900 and 1908 further burials were removed as the church sold land along its eastern edge for the construction of the Oliver Building. Despite these building episodes, church and burial ground have co-existed on this site together since 1822 creating a sacred cultural landscape that has remained remarkably constant relative to the dynamic city streetscapes around it. Today approximately 152 gravestones and monuments remain on site commemorating Pittsburgh's famous and anonymous and their fine designs reflect over two centuries of local and foreign craftsmanship.

 

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